Program

The 9th International Conference Program is displayed below, featuring the schedule for key events throughout the week of the Conference and well as highlighting selected Conference pre-events. The Program will be updated throughout the Conference with summaries of panel remarks and workshop outcomes.

Saturday, 18 June 2011
10:00 – 16:00 Creating and Sustaining Regional Environmental Compliance and Enforcement Networks
Experts from the regional and topical networks will share practical experiences and chart future collaboration, on substantive issues of mutual concern and regarding good practices for network management and governance.
Sunday, 19 June 2011
9:00 – 17:00 Environmental Compliance and Enforcement Training
INECE will facilitate two concurrent sessions of its capacity building programs: (1) the Principles of Environmental Compliance and Enforcement course and (2) the Conducting Environmental Compliance Inspections course.
18:30 – 20:30 Welcoming Reception

  • Chief Gibby Jacob, Squamish Nation
  • Justice Antonio Herman Benjamin, High Court of Brazil; INECE EPC Co-chair
Monday, 20 June 2011
Day Chair: Justice Antonio Herman Benjamin, High Court of Brazil, INECE EPC Co-chair
8:30-9:15 Welcoming Remarks

  • Durwood Zaelke, Director, INECE Secretariat
9:15-9:30 Opening Keynote: Call to Action on International Enforcement Cooperation
Speaker: Lisa Jackson, Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
9:30-10:00 The Power of Enforcement Cooperation
During this inspirational speech, the nominated expert will share remarks on the power of transgovernmental networks and enforcement cooperation.
Speaker: Minister Izabella Teixeira, Ministry of the Environment, Brazil
10:30-12:00 Panel Session 1 – The Value of Enforcement Cooperation
Cooperation among government officials to exchange information and coordinate activity across national borders and institutions creates efficiencies in combating environmental crimes and enabling green economic growth. Transgovernmental networks, such as INECE, facilitate communications, support problem solving, leverage capacity building, and improve enforcement response. This panel will explore the value of networks for enforcement cooperation at the national, regional, and international levels, including ways that collaboration leads to effective implementation of international agreements. Panelists will propose strategies for expanding the use of environmental compliance and enforcement networks to create efficiencies in responding to common environmental challenges, including the illegal transboundary movement of waste.

Panelists:

  • Moderator: Gerard Wolters, Inspector-General for International Enforcement Cooperation, Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment, The Netherlands
  • Catherine McCabe, Principal Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, US EPA, INECE EPC Co-chair
  • Dinah Brandful, Assistant Commissioner, Customs, Excise and Preventive Service, Ghana
  • Michael Faure, Chairman, Flemish High Council of Environmental Enforcement
13:15-15:15 Workshop Session 1

  • A1 – International Inspections Exercise: Lessons Learned
  • B1 – Tools for Fighting Non-Compliance in Market-Based Trading Programs
  • C1 – Intelligence Led Enforcement
  • D1 – INECE Input into the Rio +20 Process
  • E1 – Communication Strategies to Promote Compliance
  • F1 – Administrative and Judicial Enforcement: The Role of Green Courts
  • G1 – Open Space Discussion on Forest and Biodiversity Crimes
15:30 – 17:30 Workshop Session 2

  • A2 – Controlling Illegal Transboundary Shipments Of Hazardous Waste
  • B2 – GHG Monitoring and Reporting
  • C2 – Synergistic Implementation of MEAs and National Legislation Relating to Transboundary Waterways
  • D2 – Improving the Effectiveness of MEAs Through Enforcement of National Legislation
  • E2 – E-Waste Management
  • F2 – Defining Resource Needs and Securing Funds for Compliance Assurance
  • G2 – Environmental Prosecutors Network
19:30 Dinner at the Hotel
Dinner Speaker: Antonio Oposa, President, Law of Nature Foundation, The Philippines
Tuesday, 21 June 2011
Day Chair: Catherine McCabe, Principal Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, US EPA; INECE EPC Co-chair
9:00-9:10 Opening Remarks
Catherine McCabe, Principal Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, US EPA; INECE EPC Co-chair
09:10-10:00 Keynote Address: The Role of Strong National Environmental Institutions for Good Governance and the Green Economy

  • Achim Steiner, Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme
  • John Scanlon, Secretary General, Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Secretariat
10:15-11:45 Panel Session 2: Compliance with National Laws to Honor International Commitments
The success of multilateral environmental agreements is dependent upon strong national institutions to implement and assure compliance with domestic laws that are responsive to the international commitments. Resource constraints and lack of political will provide significant challenges to compliance and enforcement institutions around the world, but through effective cooperation, capacity building, and proper economic incentives, success can be achieved. During this session, panelists will discuss concrete examples of domestic compliance programs to meet commitments made under multilateral environmental agreements. The discussants will share ideas for establishing accountability mechanisms for assuring compliance with national environment laws which could serve as a core component of the green economy and good governance pillars of the 2012 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.

Panelists:

  • Moderator: Stacy Mitchell, Chief, Environmental Crimes Section, Environment and Natural Resources Division, United States Department of Justice
  • John Sellar, Chief of Enforcement, Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora Secretariat
  • Romina Picolotti, Former Secretary of Environment, Argentina
  • Benjamin Langwen, Director of Compliance and Enforcement, National Environmental Management Authority, Kenya
  • Amy Fraenkel, Regional Director, Regional Office for North America, United Nations Environment Programme
13:15-15:15 Workshop Session 3

  • A3 – Detecting and Prosecuting Illegal Wildlife Trafficking: A Demand Side Approach
  • B3 – Non-Carbon Dioxide Climate Compliance Strategies
  • C3 – Criminal Enforcement: Fighting Organized Crime, and Money Laundering
  • D3 – Developing Enforceable Requirements
  • E3 – Alternatives to Criminal Prosecutions to Promote Compliance
  • F3 – Oversight and Interagency Cooperation Mechanisms to Ensure Consistent Enforcement in Decentralized Governance Systems
  • G3 – Role of Academics in Environmental Compliance and Enforcement Networks
15:30-17:30 Workshop Session 4

  • A4 – Detecting and Deterring Illegal Logging: Source, Supply, and Demand
  • B4 -Compliance with Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions
  • C4 – Developments in Monitoring Technology, including Satellite Remote Sensing
  • D4 – Enforcement of Environmental Impact Assessment Requirements
  • E4 – Cooperation with the Private Sector: Assuring Compliance with Corporate Environmental Commitments
  • F4 – Enforcement Program Management: Strategic Planning and Performance Indicators
  • G4 – Regional Environmental Compliance and Enforcement Networks
18:15 Barbeque Atop Whistler Mountain
Wednesday, 22 June 2011
7:00 Early Breakfast in the Cheakamus Room
8:00 – various Environmental Compliance and Enforcement Site Visits

Participants will travel by bus to the demonstration site of their choice. At the sites, local experts will discuss compliance and enforcement programs, share experience from the field, and highlight lessons learned. All three buses will meet for lunch at Stanley Park in downtown Vancouver.

Group 1: Port Metro Vancouver
Positioned on the southwest coast of British Columbia in Canada, Port Metro Vancouver jurisdiction covers nearly 600 kilometers of shoreline extending North from Point Roberts at the Canada/U.S. border. Port Metro Vancouver is a dynamic gateway for domestic and international trade and tourism, and a major economic force that strengthens the Canadian economy. As the fourth largest tonnage port in North America, they offer 28 major marine cargo terminals and three Class 1 railroads, providing a full range of facilities and services to the international shipping community. Port officials will discuss a variety of compliance and enforcement issues faced by Canada’s largest and busiest port. This group will also visit the Capliano Salmon Hatchery, which supports the Chinook, Coho, and Steelhead salmon fisheries.

Group 2: Pacific Wildlife Research Centre – Riefel Bird Sanctuary & Alaksen Area
This protected wildlife habitat is composed of a designated National Wildlife Area (NWA) overlapping a Migratory Bird Sanctuary. Canadian Wildlife Services administers these lands, with the Sanctuary managed by the British Columbia Waterfowl Society under a long-term lease. Located next to the Delta Port, the NWA provides some of the best wildlife habitat and most productive agricultural land in the lower Fraser Valley. Officials will discuss the dynamic land use management issues stemming from their proximity to the Delta Port and key conservation issues in North West Canada. This group will also visit the Squamish Estuary and Wildlife Management Area, a fjord estuary which provides habitat for numerous endangered species while allowing for continued traditional, recreational and industrial uses.

Group 3: Pacific Environmental Science Centre
Located on Burrard Inlet in North Vancouver, PESC is a centre for the study of marine, estuarine and freshwater toxicology and chemistry, with specialization in bacterial source tracking, marine water quality monitoring, and salmonid toxicogenomics. The Centre works in partnership with B.C. Environment, Health Canada, Transport Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the University of Victoria. The Centre’s activities support environmental enforcement and environmental quality monitoring and key clients include municipal, First Nations, and territorial governments. This group will also visit the Squamish Estuary and Wildlife Management Area, a fjord estuary which provides habitat for numerous endangered species while allowing for continued traditional, recreational and industrial uses.

17:00 Dinner On Your Own
Thursday, 23 June 2011
Day Chair: Gerard Wolters, Inspector-General for International Enforcement Cooperation, Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, The Netherlands, INECE EPC Co-chair
9:00-9:15 Opening Remarks
9:15-9:45 Keynote Speech: Future Trends and Tipping Points
Durwood Zaelke, Director, INECE Secretariat
09:45-11:15 Panel Session 3: Compliance with Existing Laws and Policies that Deliver Climate Change Benefits
Strengthening compliance with existing environmental requirements can mitigate climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and by protecting ecosystem areas that store carbon. This panel will explore proven and non-traditional approaches for environmental compliance and enforcement to utilize existing laws and policies to realize climate benefits. Panelists will explore international and domestic law, including compliance promotion mechanisms under the Montreal Protocol; emissions trading programs and other market mechanisms; laws that protect forests, wetlands and other carbon sinks; and laws to reduce emissions of particulates. The panel will emphasize measures that maximize co-benefits, such as improvements in public health and ecosystem services.

Panelists:

  • Moderator: Kenneth Markowitz, Managing Director, INECE Secretariat
  • James Cameron, Executive Director and Vice Chairman, Climate Change Capital
  • Atul Bagai, Senior Regional Coordinator, Compliance Assistance Programme, United Nations Environment Programme
  • Mas Santosa, Senior Advisor, Human Rights, Legal Reform and Access to Justice, UNDP Indonesia
  • Stephen O. Andersen, Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development
  • Kunihiko Shimada, Special Advisor to the Minister, Ministry of the Environment, Japan
11:30-13:30 Workshop Session 5

  • A5 – Information Sharing in Enforcement Cooperation Projects
  • B5 – REDD+ and Enforcement
  • C5 – Compliance Management Systems
  • E5 – Cooperation With Civil Society To Strengthen Enforcement
  • F5 – Development of Core Competency for Environmental Compliance Professionals
  • G5 – The Role of Cities and Municipalities in Environmental Compliance and Enforcement
13:30-15:30 Lunch including Buffet of Ideas
During lunch, participants will join the “Buffet of Ideas” topic table of their choosing. Discussions will begin over lunch and continue into the afternoon.
15:30-16:30 Report-Out on the Buffet of Ideas and Discussion
Moderator: Gerard Wolters, Inspector-General for International Enforcement Cooperation, Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, The Netherlands; INECE EPC Co-chair
19:00 Reception at the Squamish Lil’Wat Cultural Center
INECE will host a reception at the Squamish Lil’Wat Cultural Center at 19:00. The Center celebrates the joint history of the Squamish and Lil’wat First Nations by showcasing their histories, creative works, and cultures in an interactive format.
Friday, 24 June 2011
Day Chair: Catherine McCabe, Principal Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, US EPA, INECE EPC Co-chair
09:00-09:30 Keynote Address
Scott Fulton, General Counsel, Office of General Counsel, US Environmental Protection Agency
09:30-11:0[ Panel Session 4: Non-Traditional Approaches to Assure Compliance
Traditional means of enforcing environmental laws are often resource-intensive for regulators and for the regulated community. Promoting compliance through non-traditional means offers significant benefits to environmental enforcement organizations as they confront the formidable challenge of assuring compliance in a resource-restricted environment. These challenges can be best addressed through a mix of voluntary and compulsory strategies to bring about compliant behavior such as awareness campaigns, encouragement and celebration of compliant companies, ‘green’ awards, performance benchmarking, naming-and-shaming non-compliant companies, and innovative remedies. This panel will explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches and strategies to change compliance behavior and will identify examples of good practice and evidence of effectiveness.

Panelists:

  • Moderator: Dr. Paul Leinster, Chief Executive, Environment Agency of England and Wales
  • Katharina Kummer Peiry, Executive Secretary of the Basel Convention
  • John Merritt, Chief Executive Officer, EPA Victoria, Australia
  • Tony Oposa, President, Law of Nature Foundation, The Philippines
11:30-12:00 Presentation of the Conference Statement
Moderators: Justice Antonio Herman Benjamin, Catherine McCabe, and Gerard Wolters
12:00-13:00 Open Forum on Steps Forward for INECE
Conference participants will have an opportunity to provide comments and feedback on the future of environmental compliance and enforcement, as well as on the results of the Conference.
13:00-14:30 Closing Ceremony with lunch to follow